Renal Failure In Children

Treatment for chronic kidney disease focuses on slowing the progression of kidney damage, usually by controlling the cause. But, even controlling the cause might not keep kidney damage from progressing. Chronic kidney disease can progress to end-stage kidney failure, which is fatal without artificial filtering or a kidney transplant.

The kidneys are 2 bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. Healthy kidneys clean waste products from the blood by making urine. They also balance the amount of certain elements in your blood , and make hormones that control blood pressure and red blood cells. Learn what healthy eating means for people in every stage of kidney disease, including those on dialysis or living with a kidney transplant. If you have kidney failure (end-stage renal disease or ESRD), you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant to live. There is no cure for ESRD, but many people live long lives while on dialysis or after having a kidney transplant.

When your kidneys fail, it means they have stopped working well enough for you to survive without dialysis or a kidney transplant. The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure, which are responsible for up to two-thirds of the cases. Diabetes happens when your blood sugar is too high, causing damage to many organs in your body, including the kidneys and heart, as well as blood vessels, nerves and eyes.

Take the time to learn from your doctor about how to best care for your health, manage your medications, and eat well. End-stage renal disease, also called end-stage kidney disease or kidney failure, occurs when chronic kidney disease — the gradual loss of kidney function — reaches an advanced state. In end-stage renal disease, your kidneys no longer work as hypertension expert witness specialist they should to meet your body’s needs. Drug overdoses, accidental or from chemical overloads of drugs such as antibiotics or chemotherapy, along with bee stings may also cause the onset of acute kidney injury. Unlike chronic kidney disease, however, the kidneys can often recover from acute kidney injury, allowing the person with AKI to resume a normal life.

Your doctor can give you a blood test that will measure your creatinine levels and help determine your level of kidney function. The earlier CKD is detected, the greater the benefit of early treatment. Prevention is the best chance to maintain kidney function, and controlling high blood pressure and diabetes over a lifetime can decrease the potential for progressive kidney damage. Chronic kidney failure may be managed to help monitor electrolyte and waste product levels in the bloodstream. Major abnormalities can be life-threatening, and treatment options may be limited to dialysis or transplant.

However, this effect does not apply to people with type 2 diabetes. A whole food, plant-based diet may help some people with kidney disease. A high protein diet from either animal or plant sources appears to have negative effects on kidney function at least in the short term. Detecting chronic kidney disease can be tricky because the signs and symptoms of kidney disease occur late, after the condition has progressed and kidney damage has occurred. In fact, CKD is sometimes known as a “silent” condition because it’s hard to detect—and most people with early stage CKD are completely unaware of it.

Anemia also contributes to fatigue and generalized weakness. The most common causes of chronic failure are diabetes mellitus and long-term, uncontrolled hypertension. Polycystic kidney disease is another well-known cause of chronic failure. The majority of people afflicted with polycystic kidney disease have a family history of the disease. Acute kidney injury – or AKI – usually occurs when the blood supply to the kidneys is suddenly interrupted or when the kidneys become overloaded with toxins.